Writing Standard

Writing Standard

Inasmuch as writing is a process that often involves editing and proofreading, the control of technical aspects of writing and overall appearance of final products should be represented fairly in the evaluation of the assignment.
In the four main types of writing (informal, formal, polished, published) the level of expertise in technical control expected must be stated clearly and adhered to in evaluation.

  • An informal writing piece is the most unrestricted and normally displays the most surface errors in the student’s writing. Journal writing, free writing, beginning writing, and rough drafts would be considered informal writing.
  • A formal writing piece may contain errors, but it is expected that many rudimentary mistakes will have been remedied in the editing process. In-class exams, Regents exams, most lab write-ups, spelling word sentences, some
    homework assignments, and other on-demand writing tasks would be considered formal writing.
  • A polished writing piece suggests the final product is the student’s best effort and should be relatively free from errors in spelling, punctuation, grammar, and overall technical control. Most pieces produced over a period of time utilizing all aspects of the writing process would be considered polished writing.
  • A published writing piece suggests the final product is not only the student’s est effort, but also one that has undergone substantial editing and revision, often by editors other than the writer. Published pieces should be free of errors. Articles in student newspapers or magazines, pieces for display in the classroom, and writing pieces collected for presentation would be considered published writing.