Social Studies

Social Studies is the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities intended to promote civic competence. The focus of the Fayetteville-Manlius High School Social Studies program is on concept and skill mastery through investigation of content appropriate to each course of study. Social Studies draws upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, belief systems, and sociology. The primary purpose of Social Studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world. F-M’s program is grounded in the Common Core Learning Standards and the five New York State Learning Standards for Social Studies, which are: 1) History of the United States and New York; 2) World History; 3) Geography; 4) Economics; 5) Civics, Citizenship and Government. All students are required to earn four units of Social Studies in order to graduate.

Requirements in Social Studies

  • Global History & Geography 9
  • Global History & Geography 10
  • United States History & Government 11
  • Participation in Government and Economics 12

Electives in Social Studies

  • Anthropology
  • Psychology
  • SUPA Psychology
  • Sociology
  • SUPA Sociology
  • AP Comparative Government
  • Facing Genocide
  • AP European History

All electives are one semester in length with the exception of AP European, which is a full-year course.

Honors

At each grade level and in some electives the Social Studies curriculum is offered at the honors, AP or SUPA level. Students can expect that required content will be approached at an accelerated pace with an emphasis on skill development and enrichment. Students who wish to participate in honors level courses regularly exhibit the following traits:

  • Intellectual curiosity, as demonstrated by consistent engagement with the content and a willingness to  investigate topics beyond their surface;
  • Intellectual maturity, as demonstrated by the ability to work independently on reading and writing assignments to allow for robust class discussion and critical analysis;
  • A strong work ethic, as demonstrated by on time completion of rigorous course work.

GRADE NINE – GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

Global History and Geography 9 approaches world history chronologically with an emphasis on historical thinking skills. Units of study in line with New York State Frameworks will include: The First Civilizations; Classical Societies; An Age of Expanding Connections; and Global Interactions. This course provides the foundation for the study of modern world history in 10th grade and its required Regents exam.

0001 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 9 Humanities

40 Weeks, 1 credit, Regents

Students are engaged in the exploration of the same history content and social sciences as discussed in the 0002 Global History and Geography 9 course below. However, Humanities students receive support in developing their literacy and historical thinking skills. Students must also enroll in English 9 Humanities 7704, which allows for a team approach to various topics and assignments when appropriate. Students are selected based on middle school recommendation.

0002 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 9

40 Weeks, 1 credit, Regents

Students are engaged in the exploration of several aspects of social science including anthropology, geography, and political philosophy, not just history. Students experience history and culture through a range of activities including textbook and primary source reading, debates, role-plays, class projects and presentations and film studies. Important skills like writing, critical analysis, research and organization are emphasized. Students develop an appreciation for diversity and global citizenship, as well as an intellectual curiosity important to their high school career. Final exam – Local.

0003 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 9

40 weeks, 1 credit, Interdisciplinary, Honors

This course follows the standard Global History & Geography curriculum, but also provides students with challenging opportunities to interrelate social studies content with literary works and language arts skills. To be successful in this honors program, students must have a strong interest in social studies and English. They must be able to undertake long-term reading, writing, and research assignments. Cooperative learning projects, public speaking, and independent work are integral components of the course. The Model United Nations program is incorporated into the curriculum and requires students to become proficient in all of the aforementioned skills which must be exhibited at a weekend conference held at Syracuse University in January. Overall, instruction is focused on developing the high level critical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Final exam – local. (Note: Students must also enroll in English 8888).

0004 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 9

40 weeks, 1 credit, Honors

This course focuses upon analyzing broad themes, concepts, trends, events and issues of world history from Ancient Civilizations through the Middle Ages, as well as developing an understanding of diverse cultures. Students experience history and culture through a range of activities including textbook and primary sources. Students must be able to undertake long-term reading, writing and research assignments and must have demonstrated a high level of interest in social studies and above average ability in reading, writing and research. Students should be prepared to further develop their critical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation of the social sciences. Final exam – Local.

GRADE 10 – GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

Global History and Geography 10 continues the chronological study of world history to the present day. Several concepts are woven throughout the course including industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, conflict, technology, and the interconnectedness of the world. Historical thinking skills and units of study will focus on: The World in 1750; the Age of Revolutions, Industrialization, and Empires; Crisis and Achievement in the 20th Century; and Contemporary World Issues.

0011 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 10

40 weeks, 1 credit, Regents

Students will continue several aspects of social science as they experience the history and culture of a wide range of people from around the world. Projects, debates, class discussions and traditional assessments will reinforce reading and writing assignments from text books, primary source documents and current events articles. As students develop an understanding of the links between the past and present, they will be preparing for the NYS Regents exam. Final exam – NYS Regents.

0013 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 10

40 weeks, 1 credit, Interdisciplinary, Honors

This course follows the standard Global History & Geography curriculum and correlates this content with literary works and language arts skills at a very challenging level. The expectations of this course include sophisticated readings from an advanced textbook and historical documents. Students are also expected to complete research and writing assignments and to take independent notes from different instructional sources. Cooperative learning projects, public speaking, and debating are also integral components of this course. Instruction is focused on developing a high level of the critical thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, self-discipline, and reflection as applied to the study of the humanities. It is suggested that students exemplify a strong interest and previous academic success in social studies and English in order to enroll in this course. Final exam – NYS Regents. (Note: Students must enroll in English 8889.)

0014 GLOBAL HISTORY & GEOGRAPHY 10

40 weeks, 1 credit, World History AP

This course highlights the nature of changes in world history and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. There is an emphasis on relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence. Students will explore several time periods and discuss change and continuity throughout the course. Students will develop skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgement and to effectively communicate their findings. Students must be strong readers, and must be capable of working independently. The demands on the students are equivalent to those made by college courses, and will culminate in the national AP exam in World History given in May. Find out more at CollegeBoard.com. Students will also be required to take the New York State Regents Exam in Global History & Geography in June as the final exam for the course.

GRADE 11 – GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

US History begins with colonial and constitutional foundations and explores the structure and functions of the US Government and Constitution. Social, political and economic factors leading to the Civil War, as well as industrial, urbanization and expansion are examined. America’s emergence as a world power and 20th Century wars are a focus. Students also explore the expansion of federal power, civil rights and the place of the US in an increasingly interconnected world.

0031 UNITED STATES HISTORY & GOVERNMENT Regents

40 weeks, 1 credit, Grade 11

This course follows the history of the United States from the colonial period to the present. Following the New York State Social Studies Framework, students will further develop their understanding of our nation’s history through a variety of activities including class discussions, simulations, research assignments, projects, thematic and DBQ essay writing as well as multiple choice tests. Topics covered include history and function of the U.S. Constitution; the age of reform in antebellum America; the Civil War, Reconstruction and the age of big business; as well as strong emphasis on 20th century foreign and domestic policy. Final exam – NYS Regents.

0033 UNITED STATES HISTORY & GOVERNMENT

40 weeks, 1 credit, Grade 11, American Studies Honors

This course is designed to meet the requirements of the state frameworks while challenging students to engage more critically with the subject. To be successful in this honors program students must be able to undertake extensive reading, writing, and research projects. Students will develop their understanding of the complex issues and themes through various narrative histories as well as novels, short stories and other primary resources. Students can expect to assume responsibility for independent learning throughout the course. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of these themes through exams, papers, presentations and debates. Final exam – NYS Regents.

0032 UNITED STATES HISTORY & GOVERNMENT AP

40 weeks, 1 credit, Grades 11-12

This course is designed to develop the analytical skills and factual knowledge needed to deal critically with United States History from the colonial period through the present. Students will learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented by a variety of sources. Students will develop skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgement and to effectively communicate their findings. Students must be strong readers, and must be capable of working independently. The demands on the students are equivalent to those made by college courses, and will culminate in the national AP exam in United States History given in May. Find out more at CollegeBoard.com. Students will also be required to take the NY State Regents Exam in US History & Government in June as the final exam for the course.

GRADE 12 – GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

Students are required by New York state to earn one-half unit of economics and one-half unit of participation in government. The Economics requirement may be satisfied by completing one of the following:

  • Economics
  • Economics Regents
  • Economics (Syracuse University Project Advance)

The Participation in Government requirement may be satisfied by completing one of the following:

  • Participation in Government
  • Law Studies
  • Public Affairs (Syracuse University Project Advance)

These courses generally consider theory, methodology and substantive aspects of each discipline. They are designed to provide practical application to everyday experiences, present opportunities to develop research skills, encourage participation in the political, economic and social aspects of our society, and facilitate further study in college. Each course carries one-half unit of credit.

0040 ECONOMICS

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 12

This course is designed for the student who has consistently demonstrated difficulty with skill areas in social studies. It will examine micro and macro aspects of the economy, but the emphasis will be placed on macroeconomics. By examining the roles of consumers, business, labor, government, and financial institutions in the economy, problem solving, decision-making, and critical thinking skills are developed. Skills in interpreting important economic indices and trends are also developed. Final exam – Local.

0041 ECONOMICS Regents

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 12

This course examines both micro and macro aspects of economic systems. Using economic models as a framework for analysis, attempts are made to apply economic theory to interpret current economic development. Student projects are utilized to promote an understanding of economic and financial events. Capital markets are studied and used as a starting point to analyze national and international economies. Markets for stocks, bonds, commodities, money and foreign exchange are studied. Skills in reading and understanding business and financial news are developed. Final exam – Local.

0048 ECONOMICS SUPA

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 12

This course begins with a presentation of the scientific method which is then used to analyze the question: how do individuals and societies make choices when they are faced with scarcity? Beginning with the individual in the simplest of situations, a one-person society, the course moves step by step to develop a model of a complex society based on division of labor and exchange through markets. The process takes students from the microeconomics to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. Students examine the benefits, as well as the problems, inherent in a market-oriented economy. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the on-going economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists. This course is the same as Economics 203 on the S.U. campus. Upon registration and payment of tuition at Syracuse University, students are eligible for three hours of college credit as well as 1/2 unit of high school credit. The course will appear as Syracuse University Project Advance on the student’s transcript. Students may choose to take this course for high school credit only. It will be designated as “college level” (CL) on the student’s transcript.

0049 PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 12

This course aims to provide students with opportunities to become engaged in the political process by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary for active citizenship. We seek to apply their prior social studies learning to the examination of contemporary political issues. The emphasis is on current events, societal problems, as identified by students, and strategies for change. Students work on political advocacy skills, media literacy, interactions with political leaders and persuasive speaking and writing skills to realize their potential as young citizens. The course allows students to apply political and governmental topics to their lives in school, the local community and at the national level. Class activities include dynamic discussion, debates, group-based projects, field trips and community interaction, all exercised with the intention of empowering students to formulate political opinions and to see themselves as necessary to the democratic process.

0042 PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT: Law Studies

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 12

This course aims to provide students with opportunities to become engaged in the political process by acquiring the knowledge and practicing the skills necessary for active citizenship. This course is designed to develop critical reasoning and assist students in understanding laws as they pertain to real life situations. The curriculum incorporates both criminal and civil law. Mock trials are held to help students understand the legal process. Professionals in law-related fields are used to provide additional information and topics of special interest.

0047 PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT: Syracuse University Project Advance Public Affairs

20 weeks n 1/2 credit n Grade 12

Public Affairs, Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy, is designed to introduce students to basic skills of public policy analysis. Students completing the course should possess the ability to define and identify the components of public policy issues, communicate ideas and findings with respect to these issues, conduct research, design a study to evaluate the impact of a proposed public policy, and analyze the political factors affecting the implementation of such policy. Upon registration and payment of tuition to Syracuse University, students are eligible for three hours of college credit as well as 1/2 unit of high school credit. This course is the same as Public Affairs 101 on the S.U. campus. The course will appear as Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) on the student’s transcript. Students may choose to take this course for high school credit only. It will be designated as “college level” (CL) on the student’s transcript.

ELECTIVES

Social Studies electives are open to students interested in exploring human behavior, culture, and social issues. These courses are designed to provide additional opportunities to sharpen students’ skills in the social sciences and broaden their understanding of society’s most interesting questions.

0016 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS AP

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 11-12

The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. These countries include: China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia and Iran. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives and to demonstrate the importance of global change. The course will run in the Spring semester to prepare students for the May AP exam, but will also include locally developed curriculum and assessments. Please Note: This course will be offered in alternating years with AP European History. Comparative Government will be offered in 2019-2020.

0055 FACING GENOCIDE: Our History & Ourselves

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 10-12

This course is about the light and dark sides of human nature. It is about human psychology, group dynamics, and contested historical issues. It is about how we create and preserve truthful collective memory in the face of denial. It is about rescuers, resistors, perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. It is about the most ruthless criminals in history, and the everyday heroes who opposed them. It is about how people protected human rights in times of crisis and how individuals are standing up for the rights of others today. Most of all, this class is about the choices people make: choices to act with courage, hatred, tolerance, prejudice, kindness, and indifference. Students explore these topics through discussion, film, journal-writing, research, literature, and other media. The class focuses on learning ways to prevent violence and suffering and to build a better future by learning from the past.

0045 SOCIOLOGY

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 10-12

Ever wonder how ideas about race, gender and status develop in our society? How does a group establish its identity? How does data help us both track society’s past trends and predict its future actions? Questions like these and many others are considered in high school Sociology. Through readings, research, interpretation of data, and discussion, students will tackle fascinating questions of race, ethnicity, gender, identity and youth culture and examine how these issues are related to American society and its institutions. Students will develop social science skills and a vocabulary that will be helpful in high school, college and beyond.

0046 SOCIOLOGY SUPA

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 11-12

Sociology encourages the student to develop a critical attitude toward society, the self and relationships between them. A goal of this course is for students to develop a basic understanding of sociological knowledge, of central theories and of frameworks used by sociologists. The core units are: Work/Class/Race; Identity; Media; and College Youth Culture. Speakers, projects, and scholarly journal articles help us examine these topics.
Upon registration and payment of tuition to Syracuse University, students are eligible for three hours of college credit as well as 1/2 unit of high school credit. This course is the same as Sociology 101 on the S.U. campus. The course will appear as Syracuse University Project Advance on the student’s transcript. Students may choose to take this course for high school credit only. It will be designated as “college level” (CL) on the student’s transcript.

0053 ANTHROPOLOGY

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 10-12

Anthropology is the study of human development and culture. Topics in physical anthropology include primate evolution, early hominids, modern Homo sapiens, and human variation. Special emphasis is given to archeological methods and discoveries. Students also study world cultures to understand different views on gender issues, economics, race, religion, violence, modernity, and globalization. In past years, students have taken field trips to archeological labs, the American Museum of Natural History in NYC, and the Oneida Community Mansion House. Anthropology students have also flint knapped their own stone tools and participated in a real archeological dig at the Broadfield site, where an Onondaga village existed in 1500 A.D.

0043 PSYCHOLOGY

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grades 10-12

This elective is for students with an interest in learning about the many facets of the field of psychology, but may not want to seek a college level investigation of the subject. High School Psychology is an introduction to topics such as personality, consciousness, motivation, thinking, learning, as well as the biological base of behavior and abnormal psychology.

0044 PSYCHOLOGY SUPA

20 weeks, 1/2 credit, Grade 11-12

The purposes of this course are to acquaint students with the use of the scientific method in studying individual behavior with the primary concepts and questions of psychology, and the major research in each of the foundation areas. Those foundation areas are learning, neurophysiology, personality and abnormal and cognitive behavior. The course is taught under the direction of the psychology department at Syracuse University and is the same as Psychology 205, Foundations of Human Behavior. Upon registration and payment of tuition to Syracuse University, students are eligible for three hours of college credit as well as 1/2 unit of high school credit. The course will appear as Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) on the student’s transcript. Students may choose to take this course for high school credit only. It will be designated as “college level” (CL) on the student’s transcript.

0066 AP European History

40 weeks, 1 credit, Grade 11-12

This course focuses on the study of European history since 1450 and introduces students to cultural, economic, political and social developments that have played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which we live. In addition to exploring the narrative of events and movements during this time, students will develop and understand some of the main themes in modern European history, improve their ability to analyze historical evidence and interpretation, and continue their work in expressing historical understanding in writing. Topics will include: Intellectual and Cultural History; Political and Diplomatic History; and Social and Economic History. Students must be strong readers and must be capable of working independently. The demands on students are equivalent to those made by college courses and will culminate in the national AP exam in European History given in May. Find out more about the course at CollegeBoard.comPlease Note: This course will be offered in alternating years with AP Comparative Government and Politics. AP European History will be offered in 2018-2019 and again in 2020-2021.